Juicy Red Tomatoes

They’re not tiny, and they’re no longer green. They’re finally ripe! Yes, my tomato season has begun. We have started harvesting and so far we have about 10 ready to eat. As of today, 3 Celebrity and 7 Roma tomatoes have been collected. You might have seen one in the salad; here are pictures of some of the others.

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Ari, at six, is a long time tomato-lover. Just like me, she prefers them whole. The other day we took a “field trip” to a llama rescue farm, and for lunch she packed herself a tomato along with her sandwich.

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How Local Is Your Salad?

This year I am growing my own vegetables, and tonight I finally got to taste the fruits of my labor.

Local-Salad

Yes, the tiny green tomatoes are ripened, the lettuce and spinach were harvested, and you can even see a few bean sprouts in the bowl! The only thing I didn’t grow myself was the cucumber, which I bought from the produce stand two blocks away.

Local is good, but homegrown tastes even better!

Homegrown Bean Sprouts

Occasionally when I go to the grocery store, I pick up a bag of bean sprouts with the best of intentions. I enjoy eating bean sprouts, but once I get home they go straight in the fridge. The next time I get them out, they have invariably gone bad.  It could be a few hours or days, but I rarely get to eat them.

Besides tasting good, mung beans are a natural source of vitamins A, B, C, and E and minerals including Calcium, Iron, and Potassium. They are high in fiber and are easily digestible. They are very low in calories and make a great snack or an addition to a meal.

A few weeks ago I picked up a bean sprouter from Freecycle, complete with a half bag of mung beans. I brought it home and started some sprouts. They are very easy to grow and taste great fresh. The best part is that if I forget about them, they just keep growing instead of going bad! Continue reading “Homegrown Bean Sprouts”